Reclaiming Sacred Dakota Land at Camp Coldwater

While the Dakota did not ask for a permit for the four days, the property manager has provided one. Despite the permit and the ceremonies that are happening on site, there continues to be heavy surveillance by Homeland Security, Hennepin County Sheriffs, and riot-police from various police agencies.

On September 2nd, members of the Oceti Sakowin (Seven Council Fires) of the Dakota Oyate reoccupied Coldwater Spring and the surrounding land in Minnesota. The Coldwater Spring site is an abandoned property of the United States Department of the Interior’s defunct Bureau of Mines. Dakota people consider the spring as essential to their spiritual lifeway and the surrounding land as a part of their homeland of B’Dote. Dakota people believe that they will be better stewards of the land than either the United States or the State of Minnesota has been. This is evidenced in the fact that the site is littered with dilapidated structures and the soil is polluted from the former Bureau of Mines.

Continue reading “Reclaiming Sacred Dakota Land at Camp Coldwater”

Plainclothes Police at the March for Our Lives in St. Paul

On September 2nd in St. Paul, the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign (PPEHRC) brought together poor and homeless people of every race, background and age, students, social workers, union members, lawyers, religious leaders, artists and others who stand for social and economic justice. The PPEHRC raised their voices in the “March for Our Lives” to demand “Money for Health Care and Housing, Not for War!”

The rally held at Mears Park and the march that followed were heavily infiltrated by plainclothes law enforcement officers.

Continue reading “Plainclothes Police at the March for Our Lives in St. Paul”

March for Our Lives at the RNC in St. Paul

On September 2nd in St. Paul, the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign (PPEHRC) brought together poor and homeless people of every race, background and age, students, social workers, union members, lawyers, religious leaders, artists and others who stand for social and economic justice. The PPEHRC raised their voices in the “March for Our Lives” to demand “Money for Health Care and Housing, Not for War!”

Health care and housing should never be luxuries – not in the United States, not anywhere. Toward this end, the PPEHRC called for protestors to fill the streets of St. Paul, Minnesota in a powerful, peaceful demonstration for the right to healthcare, housing and all economic human rights. As poverty, hunger, unemployment and homelessness grow throughout the United States, political leaders from both major parties have abandoned the common people.

Continue reading “March for Our Lives at the RNC in St. Paul”

Ripple Effect at RNC in Minnesota: War Isn’t Nice

On September 2nd, thousands of people gathered at the state capitol lawn in St. Paul, Minnesota to engage in trainings, educational workshops, community building activities, music, and art in the name of positive social and environmental change. Featured artists and speakers included Michael Franti, Anti-Flag, Dead Prez, Winona LaDuke, and Medea Benjamin.

Organized by a local nonprofit led by three motivated young progressives, Ripple Effect was Substance’s (the organization behind the event) first step in a series of efforts to manifest a united intergenerational front. These events are aimed at embracing the core values of the environmental and social justice movements, with a collective understanding that the solutions to these problems will require us to break down issue and generational barriers.

Continue reading “Ripple Effect at RNC in Minnesota: War Isn’t Nice”

Unpermitted Dissent in the Streets of St. Paul

Decentralized, unpermitted protests took place throughout the streets of downtown St. Paul, Minnesota on September 1st to mark the start of the Republican National Convention (RNC). Following the permitted demonstration organized by The Coalition to March on the RNC and Stop the War, various items were pulled into the streets, some corporations had their windows broken, and people danced without permission. There were mass arrests by the police who deployed a wide range of weaponry, including concussion grenades, tear gas, pepper spray, batons, charging horses and hard rubber bullets.

Continue reading “Unpermitted Dissent in the Streets of St. Paul”