We Are The University, We Can Shut It Down! Rally on Nov. 10

On Wednesday November 10, 2004, the members of Local 3299 AFSCME will be having a major rally when UC representatives come to the campus for state-wide bargaining. The rally will take place at 12:00 noon in front of the Baytree Bookstore on the UCSC campus.

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Yadira Speaks About the Pilgrimage Supporting Immigrants and Farmworkers

[ Yadira at the Peace & Unity 2012 march in Watsonville. ]

Yadira Ramirez and I spoke on Monday night, June 28, 2004, about the upcoming Pilgrimage Supporting Immigrants and Farmworkers. Yadira is 16 years old and from Watsonville.

Yadira also speaks about the INS (or whatever they call it now…) kidnapping people from Watsonville.

The Pilgrimage starts at 8:00 AM on June 29 in King City. The United Farm Workers are helping to organize the events which will be in support of ‘immigrants’ and farmworkers. An important focus of the pilgrimage is to build support for AgJobs (SB1645)

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UC Workers Hold Statewide Marches

Thousands of UC hospital and campus employees concerned about quality at UC launched a series of statewide marches on Thursday, May 20, 2004, to demand meetings with top UC officials.

Workers at each campus and their supporters confronted UC executives, demanding immediate action to protect quality and service at America’s premier public university system and its academic medical centers from budget cuts and managements’ misplaced priorities.

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The Maize Maze in Mexico

NAFTA has forced millions of subsistence farmers to migrate to other parts of Mexico and the US. Before NAFTA went into effect in 1994, Mexican farmers had been protected from the inexpensive, low quality, and mass-produced corn grown in the US.

Narrative Description

The purpose of my paper is to demonstrate that corn grown in the United States has flooded into Mexico and displaced traditional Mexican agricultural workers. The Maize Maze in Mexico does not fit into one particular subject, but is rather an interdisciplinary paper with elements of anthropology, ecology, and political economy. Starting with the rich cultural traditions directly related to maize, I detail the long history and importance of maize and subsistence farming to the people of Mexico.

At the heart of this paper lie the affects that the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has had on Mexican cultures, communities, and farming. NAFTA has forced millions of subsistence farmers to migrate to other parts of Mexico and the US. Before NAFTA went into effect in 1994, Mexican farmers had been protected from the inexpensive, low quality, and mass-produced corn grown in the US. US corn not only drives down the price of corn in Mexico, it also erodes the vast genetic diversity of maize since people can no longer afford to maintain the diversity through traditional growing methods.

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